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How to Cuss Someone Out in Spanish?

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How do you insult in Spanish?

Insult their mother. ….Be insensitive to their “national” identity. ….Make no effort to speak Spanish, or whatever the language of the region you’re in. ….Drive slow in the fast lane. ….Cheer for the Barcelona soccer team when you’re in a bar in Madrid. ….Mention Francisco Franco.

What are the worst swear words in Spanish?

9.3 Cabrón..9.4 Gilipollas..9.5 Capullo..9.6 Buey/Huey/Güey/Wey/We/Way..9.7 Joto..9.8 Madre..9.9 Pinche..9.10 Puta.

Spanish tends to embrace swear words wholeheartedly, peppering all kinds of sentences with expletives that might be deemed highly inappropriate in other tongues. Its far from uncommon to encounter little old ladies swearing like troopers in Spain, and you soon get used to it. But there are also some swear words and insulting phrases that could get you into trouble. Cutlure Trip counts down the strangest and funniest.

Slightly milder than the above swear words and expressions, this translates as An idiot of the bum (or arse) and just as it sounds its used to refer to how stupid someone is. Its also used in a childrens rhyme to teach the five vowels: a-e-i-o-u, el burro sabe ms que t .

Referring to the nether regions of anyones mother is never advisable, but this phrase, popular in South America, quaintly substitutes vagina for the euphemistic concha (sea shell). While English has delicate phrases such as, Not on your nelly, to mean No way, Spaniards get a little more creative, instead exclaiming, Your whore mum on a bike!. Be careful when calling someone a pendejo (a coward or a wimp) in South America, because the word is also slang for pubic hair.

If youve ever hung out with Spanish-speaking friends, youve probably had the experience of feeling left out when they refer to something with a creative string of profanity that results in uproarious laughter. Rather than pretending to laugh along, why not study up on the most common palabras sucias (dirty words) so that youre prepared to join in a favorite pastime of Spanish speakers and let the tacos fly.

Most people in the English-speaking world know tacos as the ingenious folded-tortilla meat and salsa delivery mechanism (PSA: If you have only ever tried a hard shell supermarket Old Paso brand taco that cracks into a mosaic of five isosceles triangles the instant you lay a finger on it, open a new tab and buy a flight to Mexico, Southern California, or somewhere where they serve traditional tacos inmediatamente ! While we cant be sure whether the fact that Spanish speakers now have a portable symbol for profanity is part of why the USA rejoiced when the taco emoji was released (thanks to a Taco Bell petition with 32,666 signatures), we can be sure of one thing: Spanish speakers love their swear words.

NOTE: Though in some countries curses are commonly used in front of children or older family members, the vulgarity level listed here is representative of conversation between adults in informal situations. SpanishEnglish EquivalentLiteral MeaningVulgarity Levelestpido/astupida stupid personmildbobo/adummya silly or stupid personmildpendejodorkpubic hairmildpinche __ f*cking __ maldito/athis damn thingdamned/cursed/evilmildcoopssy/cntvaginamediumchupamediasbootlicker (suck up)sock-suckermildchpamelasuck itmediumjoderfck/pss offto do it with / bother someone / screw something upmediummierdash*texcrementmid-levelgilipollas/giliidiot/jerk/dumbassmildlos cojonesbullshit/ballstesticlesmediumtu puta madremotherf*ckeryour f*cking mothermediumla hostiaholy sh*tthe host / holy communionhigh Even though the literal translations of these are pretty graphic, they are both used so often that theyve lost their sting. Just like many swear words in English, theyve lost their association with the actual body part and taken on a new, purely metaphorical meaning.

)), coo is more regularly used as an interjection or exclamation, such as when you stub your toe or drop some food on the floor. For example, if you are eating the best taco of your life, you may say something like Este taco est de puta madre , which translates to This is a motherf*cking amazing taco. However, if you used with the possessive adjective tu or su preceding ( tu/su puta madre ), it means you dont exactly approve of something. NOTE: Though in some countries curses are commonly used in front of children or older family members, the vulgarity level listed here is representative of conversation between adults in informal situations.

SpanishEnglish EquivalentLiteral MeaningVulgarity LevelMe cago en todo lo que se menea!Fck!/sht!I shit on everything that moves!highJodete! / Que te jodan!F*ck you!highCome mierdaEat sh*t!mediumSe va a la mierdaIts going to sh*tmediumVete a la mierdaGo to hellGo to the sh*tmediumQue cabrnWhat an asshole/bastardcabrn = male goatmediumLa madre que te pariMotherf*ckerthe woman that birthed youhighHijo de putaSon of a b*tchhighTonto del culoIdiotan idiot of the assmediumQue te folle un pezScrew youI hope you get f*cked by a fishmediumUy, qu care-chimbaUgh, what a d*ckheadUgh, what a penis-facemedium Though the translation is the same in English, this phrase is usually used in a teasing or sarcastic manner, rather than as an actual insult. Its been said that this phrase refers back to a time when depositing ones excrement on someone else was a way to demonstrate disrespect in Spain.

Me cago en la leche (in milk [when you need to tone it down in mixed company]) Me cago en la madre que te pari (on the mother that gave birth to you) Me cago en la leche literally translates to I sh_t in the milk, but means something like Holy sh_t! or Ive had bad luck!

Some researchers think that this may be tied to the fact that as children non-native speakers never experienced that strong, emotional taboo reaction from adults around curse words, and therefore do not feel the curse words as strongly as native speakers do. Keep in mind the hierarchy of badness and realize that some words are only appropriate with good friends far away from children (and most elders).

Let Loose Some Tacos

It’s undeniable: Spanish speakers have invented one of the best euphemisms for cursing. In Spain and some areas of Latin America, the expression In addition to the heavenly food, the word

Single-Word Swears

While taking a look at these swear words and translations, keep in mind that many swear words lose the “original” translation in their everyday usage, much as they do in English. When using the most common bad words in English, we don’t usually think of the literal translation. The level of negativity (how much we are insulting the subject) is more likely at the front of our minds. The same goes for Spanish!NOTE: Though in some countries curses are commonly used in front of children or older family members, the vulgarity level listed here is representative of conversation between adults in informal situations. Be careful using these around children, co-workers, or elders!Even though the literal translations of these are pretty graphic, they are both used so often that they’ve lost their sting. Just like many swear words in English, they’ve lost their association with the actual body part and taken on a new, purely “metaphorical” meaning. While Though it sounds a bit harsh, this phrase is actually very commonly used in Spain. When used with the preposition

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