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How to Live in Present Moment?

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Happiness How Do You Live in the Present? By Arlin Cuncic Arlin Cuncic Arlin Cuncic, MA, is the author of “Therapy in Focus: What to Expect from CBT for Social Anxiety Disorder” and “7 Weeks to Reduce Anxiety.” Learn about our editorial process Updated on November 10, 2021 Medically reviewed Verywell Mind articles are reviewed by board-certified physicians and mental healthcare professionals. Medical Reviewers confirm the content is thorough and accurate, reflecting the latest evidence-based research. Content is reviewed before publication and upon substantial updates. Learn more. by Rachel Goldman, PhD, FTOS Medically reviewed by Rachel Goldman, PhD, FTOS Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Rachel Goldman, PhD FTOS, is a licensed psychologist, clinical assistant professor, speaker, wellness expert specializing in eating behaviors, stress management, and health behavior change. Learn about our Medical Review Board Print Getty / DianaHirsch Most of us have a tendency to live in the past or the future. How often do you find yourself thinking about what happened yesterday, or what might happen tomorrow? How does this affect your life and well-being? In this article, we will discuss how to live in the present moment more frequently, and some ways that can help you get back into living mindfully. Notice Your Surroundings One way to be in the present moment is by noticing your surroundings. How often do you take time out of your day to actually look around and see what’s going on? When was the last time you sat down, closed your eyes, took a deep breath, and just looked at everything around you? Take this opportunity right now: close both of your eyes and take a deep breath, then open them and really take in where you are. How do the walls look? What about the floor or ceilingwhat patterns can you see there? How many windows are there to your left and right? How many lights can you count from here? When you stop to look at your surroundings and take in everything around you, it’s easier to live in the present moment. Focus on One Thing at a Time (Don’t Multitask) While it may feel more productive to multitask and work on more than one thing at a time, constantly juggling multiple tasks makes it hard to live in the present moment. While doing something that requires your full attention can seem overwhelming at first, be aware of how much more productive you are when fully engaged in a task. Compare this with trying to squeeze multiple things into one period of time or spending half of your energy on three different projects. If you’re working on something, give it all of your attention. When you find yourself thinking about other things or checking your phone because you don’t feel like doing the task at hand, stop and turn that focus back to what’s in front of you. Research shows that when you are fully focused on what’s happening at that moment, you can better remember details in the long term anyway. Be Grateful For What You Have Now Part of living in the present moment is taking the time to be grateful for what you have now (not in the past or in the future). If you are constantly focused on things you don’t have, you aren’t taking the time to appreciate what you have right now at this moment. One way to practice gratitude is to write a list of things you are grateful for and review that list on a daily basis. Try to write at least three things you are grateful for in your life right now. Alternatively, you can do a gratitude rampage, where you write out as many things as you can think of in a certain time period. Accept Things As They Are (Not How You Want Them to Be) If you want to start living in the present moment, you need to let go of how you think things should be and accept them for what they are. You cannot control everything that happens around you; sometimes life is going to be different than how you want it to be. Practicing acceptance will help you let go of the things in your life that are out of your control. Practice Mindfulness Meditation One way to live more in the present moment is by practicing mindfulness meditation. This type of meditation helps people become aware and increase their concentration on what they are doing at any given time. Starting a daily meditation practice can help you become more aware of your thoughts and feelings, which can in turn increase the amount of time that you spend in the present moment. Mindfulness Meditation Techniques for Stress Relief Spend Time With People Who Make You Feel Happy and Fulfilled Spending time with people who make you feel happy and fulfilled can be a great way to help yourself live in the present moment. Surrounding yourself with positive, supportive people will increase your own positivity and happiness levels. In turn, this will allow you to focus on what is going well right now instead of dwelling on past or future events. Be Mindful of Everything You Do Whatever you are doing from eating to scrolling your phone, you should be mindful of it. How often are you eating your lunch while watching TV at the same time? This is one way you might distance yourself from what you are doing and not live in the present moment because all of your attention isn’t on that task or activity. Instead, try to focus on each meal while you eat.How does the food smell?How does it taste?How is your body reacting to what you have eaten so far?What sounds are around while you eat – phone calls, traffic noises from outside, music playing in the background. By focusing on these details and being mindful of everything going on around you during a specific task or activity, this will help bring more presentmoment awareness into your life. Practice Deep Breathing Exercises Taking the time to sit down and practice a deep breathing exercise will help you focus your mind on the task at hand. Taking slow, regulated breaths helps to prevent feelings of panic or any other negative thoughts from taking over while allowing for more control during the activity in which you are currently engaged. One quick and easy method to try is the 4-7-8 breathing technique. Take a Break From Social Media and Technology Taking a break from social media and other technology can also help you to stay more present-focused. While you might think that constantly checking your social media accounts is helping you stay connected to the world, it is actually having a negative effect on your ability to be present. How many times have you been doing something else and found yourself checking social media? It’s important that you learn how to avoid letting technology take over your life as this can really prevent you from being mindful of what is going on around you. In particular, when you are with other people, it is important that you focus on the people and environment around you, rather than being distracted by your cell phone. Get Regular Exercise or Do Some Yoga Regular exercise or even just taking a stroll through the park can help you to stay more focused on your present activities. Including yoga as part of your daily routine is another great way to live in the present, especially if it’s coupled with meditation and mindfulness exercises. If you can’t make time for all full yoga class, just stopping what you are doing to take a couple of minutes for some basic poses can help you to get back into the moment. A Word From Verywell In conclusion, living in the present moment requires that you take the time to appreciate where you are, what you’re doing, and who is with you. Instead of becoming caught up in the past or worrying about what will happen in the future, try to savor each moment as it passes. If you need help with this process, talking to a therapist can be very helpful. They can give you tools and techniques that may make living in the present easier for you. Was this page helpful? Thanks for your feedback! Learn the best ways to manage stress and negativity in your life. Sign Up You’re in! Thank you, {{form.email}}, for signing up. There was an error. Please try again. What are your concerns? Other Inaccurate Hard to Understand Submit 3 Sources Verywell Mind uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy. Madore KP, Khazenzon AM, Backes CW, et al. Memory failure predicted by attention lapsing and media multitasking. Nature. 2020;587(7832):87-91. doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2870-z Wood AM, Froh JJ, Geraghty AW. Gratitude and well-being: a review and theoretical integration. Clin Psychol Rev. 2010;30(7):890-905. doi:10.1016/j.cpr.2010.03.005 Creswell JD. Mindfulness Interventions. Annu Rev Psychol. 2017;68:491-516. doi:10.1146/annurev-psych-042716-051139 Speak to a Therapist for Happiness Advertiser Disclosure The offers that appear in this table are from partnerships from which Verywell Mind receives compensation.

How do you stay in present moment anxiety?

I predict what will happen. And anxiety dictates that it’s mostly negative. This creates more anxiety. It’s a vicious cycle..To live in the present as much as possible..1) BREATHE..2) Be a Minimalist..3) Smile..4) Forgive the past..5) Dream big, but work hard today..6) Do one thing at a time.

Why is it so hard to be in the present moment?

The other reason why it’s so hard for us to live in the present is that our intelligent cognition simply denies its existence. Our mind views time as a continuous and linear process. Because it is continuous, any millisecond before the present moment is already past and any millisecond later is already a future.

In our current twenty-first century lives, its not easy. Theres always something coming up that we need to prepare for or anticipate, and our lives are so well-documented that its never been easier to get lost in the past.

Given the fast pace and hectic schedules most of us keep, a base level of anxiety, stress, and unhappiness is the new norm. You may not even realize it, but this tendency to get sucked into the past and the future can leave you perpetually worn out and feeling out of touch with yourself.

The cure for this condition is what so many people have been saying all along: conscious awareness and a commitment to staying in the now. Living in the present moment is the solution to a problem you may not have known you had. These science-based, comprehensive exercises will not only help you cultivate a sense of presence and inner peace in your daily life but will also give you the tools to enhance the mindfulness of your clients, students or employees. Living in the present is not just an arbitrary term or a popular phraseits a recognized and evidence-backed lifestyle that psychologists are quick to recommend for those struggling with anxiety and stress in their day-to-day life.

It helps you fight anxiety, cut down on your worrying and rumination, and keeps you grounded and connected to yourself and everything around you. Although it has become a popular topic in recent years, living in the present is not just a fad or trendy lifestyle tip, it is a way of life that is backed up by good science. Being present and exerting our ability to be mindful not only makes us happier, it can also help us deal with pain more effectively, reduce our stress and decrease its impact on our health, and improve our ability to cope with negative emotions like fear and anger.

Living in the now is so difficult because we are always encouraged to think about the future or dwell on our past. Advertisements, reminders, notifications, messages, and alerts are all so often geared towards the past or the future. We face a lot of uncertainty when we live in the present, which can cause anxiety.

It can be tough fighting these factors, but luckily we are not slaves to the tendencies of our brains (Tlalka, 2017). One of the aims of mindfulness and a key factor in living a healthy life is to balance your thoughts of the past, the present, and the future. Thinking about any of them too much can have serious negative effects on our lives, but keeping the three in balance will help us to be happy and healthy people.

Its hard to say what the exact right balance is, but youll know youve hit it when you worry less, experience less stress on a regular basis, and find yourself living the majority of your life in the present. When we engage in mindfulness or present moment meditation, we are not ignoring or denying thoughts of the past or future, we are simply choosing not to dwell on them. Its okay to acknowledge and label our past- and future-focused thoughts, categorize them, and be aware of their importance.

Follow these six steps to become more attuned to the present and rid yourself of excess anxiety: Practice savoring: avoid worrying about the future by fully experiencing the present. Focus on your breath: allow mindfulness to make you more peaceful and smooth your interactions with others.

Enhance your engagement: work on reducing moments of mindlessness and noticing new things to improve your mindfulness (Dixit, 2008). You will probably not be surprised to hear that yoga is an excellent way to get connected to the present and stay in the moment. To bring yourself back into the present in a moment of stress or when youre feeling overwhelmed by the past or the future, you can try this breathing exercise from Yokeley:

This simple exercise will bring you straight to the present, even dragging along a stubborn mind that is preoccupied with worries. Another factor associated with yoga that allows us to boost our present moment awareness is the postures and poses that we make with our bodies. As irritating as this can be, its actually a good thingit means that we are beginning to process our stress and getting to a point where we can truly practice mindfulness (Bielkus, 2012).

Yogas gentle flow from one position to the next is a perfect opportunity to cultivate the ability to stay present. The transitions mimic the changes we experience as we go from working to resting to cooking to cleaning to sleeping and everything else in between. If you enjoy yoga and want to work on your present moment awareness, give this affirmation a try:

This simple exercise is a great way to get yourself in a mindful mood and get in touch with your body. Pay attention to how that area is feeling and notice any sensations that you are experiencing (Scott, n.d.). This is not only a good method for putting you in a mindful state right off the bat, it can also help you notice when your body is feeling differently than normal.

You might catch an injury or illness that you wouldnt normally notice, just by taking a few minutes each morning to scan your body. Another good exercise that can help you set the right mindful tone for the day is to write in your journal . A specific version of this exercise that is endorsed by author Julia Cameron is called Morning Pages.

Early in the morning, before youve headed off to work or school or started checking things off your long to-do list, take a few minutes to pull out your journal or a notebook and make an entry. Morning Pages provoke, clarify, comfort, cajole, prioritize, and synchronize the day at hand (Cameron, n.d., as cited in Scott, n.d.). Whether you follow Camerons guidelines or not, taking just a few minutes to write down any mindless chatter in your head or log any particularly insightful dreams can clear your head and help you start your day off in a mindful state.

Practicing visualization of goal completion can not only help you improve your focus and mindfulness, it can also lower your stress, improve your performance, enhance your preparedness, and give you the extra energy or motivation you might need to accomplish everything on your list. Taking advantage of the natural beauty around us is another good way to cultivate greater mindfulness. The next time you feel the need for a walkwhether its a quick trip around the block or a lengthy stroll through a pretty, scenic spotmake it a mindful nature walk.

Be intentional with your awareness; notice your feet hitting the ground with each step, see everything there is to see around you, open your ears to all the sounds surrounding you, feel each inhale and exhale, and just generally be aware of what is happening in each moment. It can be easy to get tired and worn out by the end of the day and let things slip. Think back to the start of the day and remember your mindfulness exercise that kicked it all off.

Think through the rest of your day, being sure to note any particularly mindful moments or memorable events. Set aside a regular block of time during your day (e.g., 5 minutes first thing in the morning or before you go to bed). Instruct the gatekeeper to keep out any thoughts of the past or the future for the rest of your current practice.

Focus on your bodily sensations: your arms resting on the arms of a chair or on your lap, your legs on the chair or folded up underneath you, the feel of your clothing on your skin, any pain or muscle aches, any twitches or flutterings, and any other sensations you might be feeling. Basic mindfulness meditation : focusing on your breathing, a word, or a mantra and allowing thoughts to come and go without judgment. Sensory: being aware of what you are seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting, and touching without judgment, then labeling them and letting the sensations pass.

Urge surfing: coping with cravings by accepting them without judgment, noticing how you feel as they hit, and reminding yourself that they will pass (HelpGuide, n.d.). As therapist and founder of Present Moment Psychotherapy & Coaching Adrienne Glasser states, present moment psychotherapy is about regulating our nervous system through an integration of traditional therapeutic modalities with modern, experiential modalities and meditation (n.d.). You may find this focus on being present and mindful to be a powerful complement to traditional, evidence-based methods of treatment.

If youre interested in learning more about the present moment or getting some extra tips and tricks on cultivating mindfulness, check out these books: For a great list of quotes on living in the present moment, check out this piece from Habits for Wellbeing. The secret of health for both mind and body is not to mourn for the past, worry about the future, or anticipate troubles, but to live in the present moment wisely and earnestly.

Unease, anxiety, tension, stress, worryall forms of fearare caused by too much future, and not enough presence. Guilt, regret, resentment, grievances, sadness, bitterness, and all forms of non-forgiveness are caused by too much past, and not enough presence. You must live in the present, launch yourself on every wave, find your eternity in each moment.

Living in the present moment means letting go of the past and not waiting for the future. It means living your life consciously, aware that each moment you breathe is a gift. The ability to be in the present moment is a major component of mental wellness.

When you have an intense contact of love with nature or another human being, like a spark, then you understand that there is no time and that everything is eternal. I have realized that the past and future are real illusions, that they exist in the present, which is what there is and all there is. I hope youve enjoyed this piece and learned something that you can apply in your own life to help you cultivate a better sense of mindfulness.

If you take just one thing home from reading this piece, make sure that its this: being mindful is extremely easy! The present moment: Where the body meets the mind in yoga class.

Not wanting to accept reality for what it is (lets call it escapism) can seem like an easy way out of stressful situations. But the truth isit only works short-term. Life needs to be experienced fully, not only in its sweetest, easiest moments.

This post contains affiliate links, which means I recommend products and make a small commission on purchases, at no additional cost to you. Im sure Im not the only one who has given in to the better tomorrow syndrome, believing that life will be sweeter at some date in the future: once I get a new job, once I lose a few kilos, or once something new happens.

Sometimes when I think about my future, instead of daydreaming about a better tomorrow, I find myself imagining the worst-case scenarios and inventing situations to worry about. If you fall into the first camp, here are a few practical ideas to help you start living in the moment and embrace the joys of today. Yet psychologists Matthew A. Killingsworth and Daniel T. Gilbert from Harvard University note: True happiness is to be found by living in the moment.

I like this quote from Buddha: We shouldnt mourn for the past, nor worry about the future, but live the present moment wisely and earnestly. Because mindfulness is purposefully paying attention to things that happen to us. We dwell on the negative side of life, increasing the levels of stress hormones and literally making our bodies sick. Today, in our fast-paced world full of external stimulation, it adds to a constant mental juggle.

Focusing on my sense of touch pulls me out of my mind, helps me let go of thoughts, and allows me to simply be in a quiet moment. so getting in touch with the Earths natural electric chargebalances out our physiology, reducing stress, pain, improving blood flow, energy and sleep. Take off your shoes and walk barefoot on grass or a sandy beach Press your palms and rub them together creating a warm sensation Sip on a hot/cold drink Get a massage (or simply rub your temples, you can add a drop of your favourite essential oil to make it more sensual) Take a few, deep belly breaths concentrating on filling your abdomen area with air and then breathing out through pursed lips with a whistle.

During your chosen grounding activity, close your eyes, focus on the feeling of your skin and your muscles, the weight of your body, the smells and sounds around you. If we can learn how to apply focus momenttomoment, then well see that play out in our longer-term goals, says Headspace co-founder Andy Puddicombe . After meditating, I feel like Ive completely emptied my brain, and I have a clean slate, ready to be filled by new thoughts of my own choosing.

The Japanese call it ikigai translated as a reason for being or a sense of purpose (iki means life and kai being worthwhile). So next time you find yourself distracted and unable to focus, instead of trying to force yourself into the present moment, ease yourself there by doing something that brings you joy. Even if youre busy, try and find a little bit of time to do something that you love, and youll quiet any mental chatter youre experiencing.

Psychologist Deborah Smith, the author of Grow Your Own Happiness , says that its a beautiful way to tap into your own inner mind.

Why is Being Present Minded Important?

Being in the present moment, or the “here and now,” means that we are aware and mindful of what is happening at this very moment. We are not distracted by ruminations on the past or worries about the future, but centered in the here and now. All of our attention is focused on the present moment (Thum, 2008).As author Myrko Thum tells it, the present moment is all there truly is:

Balancing the Past, Present, and Future

Living in the now is so difficult because we are always encouraged to think about the future or dwell on our past. Advertisements, reminders, notifications, messages, and alerts are all so often geared towards the past or the future.Think about how often you are busy doing something else, perhaps even fully engrossed in it, when you are jolted out of your flow by your phone’s sudden “ding!” Now, think about how often that message or notification helps you stay present and aware of the here and now.If you’re like me, your response to that is probably “Just about never.” Our phones are incredible pieces of technology that allow us to do so much more and do it so much more efficiently than ever before, but we really need to take a break from our phones at least once in a while.Other factors that contribute to our inability to live in the now include:It can be tough fighting these factors, but luckily we are not slaves to the tendencies of our brains (Tlalka, 2017). It is possible to overcome our more destructive or harmful urges and make better choices.

Exercises to Strengthen Present Moment Awareness

If the breathing exercise above sounds helpful, you might want to try some other exercises intended to boost your mindfulness and sense of present moment awareness. These 5 exercises are some good ways to get started.

Do a mindful body scan

This simple exercise is a great way to get yourself in a mindful mood and get in touch with your body. Doing this in the morning can also help you get your day off to a good start.While sitting or lying down on your bed (just make sure not to fall asleep if you try this lying down!), take a few deep, mindful breaths. Notice the way your breath enters and exits your lungs.Starting with your toes, focus your attention on one part of your body at a time. Pay attention to how that area is feeling and notice any sensations that you are experiencing (Scott, n.d.). After a few moments of focused attention, move up to the next part of your body (i.e., after your toes, focus on your feet, then ankles, then calves, etc.).This is not only a good method for putting you in a mindful state right off the bat, it can also help you notice when your body is feeling differently than normal. You might catch an injury or illness that you wouldn’t normally notice, just by taking a few minutes each morning to scan your body.You can learn more about the mindful body scan and other exercises here.

Write in a journal / “Morning pages”

Another good exercise that can help you set the right mindful tone for the day is to write in your journal. A specific version of this exercise that is endorsed by author Julia Cameron is called “Morning Pages.”Here’s how to use your journal as a stepping block to a more mindful day.Early in the morning, before you’ve headed off to work or school or started checking things off your long to-do list, take a few minutes to pull out your journal or a notebook and make an entry.You can do a new page each day and simply write however much you feel like writing, or you can try Cameron’s Morning Pages exercise:“Morning Pages are three pages of longhand, stream of consciousness writing, done first thing in the morning. There is no wrong way to do Morning Pages—they are not high art. They are not even “writing.” They are about anything and everything that crosses your mind—and they are for your eyes only.Morning Pages provoke, clarify, comfort, cajole, prioritize, and synchronize the day at hand” (Cameron, n.d., as cited in Scott, n.d.).Whether you follow Cameron’s guidelines or not, taking just a few minutes to write down any mindless “chatter” in your head or log any particularly insightful dreams can clear your head and help you start your day off in a mindful state.

Visualize your daily goals

Visualizing your goals is an excellent method for not only making it more likely that you will follow through on your goals, it can also help you become more mindful on a regular basis.When you have set your daily goals (see #15 – Define Three Daily Goals on this list if you need help with this piece), take a few moments to visualize each one (Scott, n.d.).See yourself undertaking each goal and completing each goal today. Get as much detail as you can in your visualization, so it feels real and within your reach.When you can see yourself checking that daily goal off your list, move on to the next goal and repeat until you have visualized all of your daily goals.Practicing visualization of goal completion can not only help you improve your focus and mindfulness, it can also lower your stress, improve your performance, enhance your preparedness, and give you the extra energy or motivation you might need to accomplish everything on your list.

Take a mindful nature walk

Taking advantage of the natural beauty around us is another good way to cultivate greater mindfulness.The next time you feel the need for a walk—whether it’s a quick trip around the block or a lengthy stroll through a pretty, scenic spot—make it a mindful nature walk.It’s pretty simple to make any walk a mindful walk; all you need to do is engage all your senses and stay aware of what’s happening both around you and within you.Be intentional with your awareness; notice your feet hitting the ground with each step, see everything there is to see around you, open your ears to all the sounds surrounding you, feel each inhale and exhale, and just generally be aware of what is happening in each moment.This exercise helps you not only connect to your authentic self, but it also helps connect you to your environment and improves your awareness of the beauty that’s all around, just waiting to be found. Add these benefits to the known benefits of walking regularly—lowered stress, better heart health, and improved mood—and you have one handy exercise!

Conduct a mindful review of your day

It can be easy to get tired and worn out by the end of the day and let things slip. To help you keep that mindful tone at the end of the day, try this exercise.Towards the end of your day, perhaps after you finish all of your “must-dos” for the day or right before heading off to bed, take a few minutes to do a review of your day (Scott, n.d.).Think back to the start of the day and remember your mindfulness exercise that kicked it all off. Think about how it made you feel.Think through the rest of your day, being sure to note any particularly mindful moments or memorable events. Take stock of your mood as you moved through your daily routine.If you want to keep track of your progress towards greater mindfulness, it’s a great idea to write all of this down in a journal or a diary; however, the point is to give yourself yet another opportunity to be mindful and end your day on the right note.

Recommended YouTube Videos

One of the best tools to keep yourself in the present moment is meditation.Any meditation will do, but there are some meditation practices geared specifically towards present moment awareness.To give this meditation a try, follow these simple steps:Although mindfulness meditation is a pretty broad catch-all term for the types of techniques that help you be more mindful and more committed to the present moment, there are some specific kinds of mindful meditations that you can try.These kinds include:

The Struggle to Be In the Moment

Admittedly, being present and living in the moment is something I’ve always struggled with—it’s a side effect of being a daydreamer! As my friends will tell you, I’m always in the middle of making new plans.It keeps life interesting, but it also means that sometimes I struggle to just be and enjoy this moment in time.I often have a countdown—waiting for the weekend, for my next holiday, or for the summer to come—and it’s easy to get in the bad habit of wishing the days away.I’m sure I’m not the only one who has given in to the “better tomorrow” syndrome, believing that life will be sweeter at some date in the future: once I get a new job, once I lose a few kilos, or once something new happens.My overactive imagination can work in the opposite direction as well. Sometimes when I think about my future, instead of daydreaming about a better tomorrow, I find myself imagining the worst-case scenarios and inventing situations to worry about.I’m capable of making things in my head look much worse than they really are. If you’ve ever spent a Sunday bummed out because you’re worried about what Monday morning has in store, then maybe you know what I mean?In either case, the problem is my thoughts are robbing me of the joy of today. Nothing in the future is ever certain, but the truth is—I am in control of how I feel, right now, at this moment.Do you always have a countdown too? Are you waiting to enjoy life or are you living in the present moment? If you fall into the first camp, here are a few practical ideas to help you start living in the moment and embrace the joys of today.So let’s hold space for each other as we embark on this mindful journey together.

Why Is It Important To Be Present?

According to a 2010 Harvard University study, we spend about 47% of waking hours thinking about something other than what we’re doing, and this mind-wandering makes us unhappy.We worry about overdue bills while playing with our kids. We obsess over a random comment made by our work colleague when out with friends. Often, we stress over things that never happened! Yet psychologists Matthew A. Killingsworth and Daniel T. Gilbert from Harvard University note: “True happiness is to be found by living in the moment.”I like this quote from Buddha: “We shouldn’t mourn for the past, nor worry about the future, but live the present moment wisely and earnestly.” Because mindfulness is purposefully paying attention to things that happen to us.When I’m making coffee in the morning, I don’t want to stress about the list of chores ahead. I don’t need to debate what I’m going to wear or say. I want to bathe in the glorious aroma of coffee and then drink it with pleasure.By getting caught up in our heads, we miss many emotional connections with people around us. We dwell on the negative side of life, increasing the levels of stress hormones and It’s not entirely your fault if you’re guilty of doing this—NOT living in the moment. Evolution has created our monkey mind to help us survive imminent dangers. Today, in our fast-paced world full of external stimulation, it adds to a constant mental juggle. But the good thing is— you have the power to change it.

TRY A MEDITATION APP

Often, when I find myself caught up in my head, the best way to break free is to find ways to physically connect myself to the present moment and the environment around me.Focusing on my sense of touch pulls me out of my mind, helps me let go of thoughts, and allows me to simply be in a quiet moment. Science proves that grounding—so getting in touch with the Earth’s natural electric charge—balances out our physiology, reducing stress, pain, improving blood flow, energy and sleep.Here are a few simple physical activities to try:During your chosen grounding activity, close your eyes, focus on the feeling of your skin and your muscles, the weight of your body, the smells and sounds around you. And then take a few deep breaths. Breathing helps to promote relaxation, stress reduction and better body awareness.I find this tip especially useful when I’m worrying about the future. By focusing on my body, I am reminded that right now, at this moment, I’m here, safe and everything is ok.

FIND TIME TO DO SOMETHING YOU LOVE

Have you ever lost track of time? It happens when you’re doing something you really enjoy—you get in the ‘zone’, and you lose focus on everything but the task in front of you.In other words, your attention is devoted to what you’re doing now instead of somewhere in the past or future. You’re in a state of flow. There is a sense of fluidity between your body and mind. Time feels like it has slowed down.The Japanese call it So next time you find yourself distracted and unable to focus, instead of trying to force yourself into the present moment, ease yourself there by doing something that brings you joy.Do you know what sets you on fire and lets you lose yourself in the zone? Lately, for me, it’s working on this blog—I find the creative writing process so therapeutic! Maybe for you, it’s baking, dancing, or perhaps painting?Even if you’re busy, try and find a little bit of time to do something that you love, and you’ll quiet any mental chatter you’re experiencing.

KEEP A RECORD

Writing—or as it is now fancily called: There’s plenty of scientific evidence that journaling has amazing benefits for our health. When we write, we access our left, analytical brain, allowing our right brain to be free to create, intuit and feel. That’s why it always feels so liberating to scribble down a few thoughts or pen a letter.One thing I liked to do is keep a simple scrapbook—nothing fancy, just a few momentos or scribbles about how I spend each day. What I noticed is that keeping a record of my daily activities helps me to be mindful and take notice of the little joys in life. Instead of mindlessly going through my day (or worse—scrolling down on my phone), I’m actively seeking to remember it so that I can record it later.I now use my journal religiously and try to keep a little log of my daily activities. It doesn’t have to be epic adventures; the small things, like an evening walk with my husband or taking a few minutes to finish a difficult task, are worth recording and remembering.New to journaling? Try these journaling ideas or these simple journal prompts.

More Mindfulness Resources

If you’d like to learn more, here are several resources about mindful living that I think you’ll enjoy.

alertarticles.infoHello, my name is Silva. This is my blog about knowledge. People email me some interesting questions about life, riddles, relationships, and more and I try to answer them to the best of my ability. You will find all the knowledge of the world here!

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